Ionic on Chrome Os

#1

Hi guys!
I wanna know if someone knows how to set up Ionic + Android SDK + Cordova on Chrome Os.
Surfing the net I haven’t found anything usefull.

#2

Do you want to run an Ionic app on Chrome OS or develop Ionic apps?

#3

I’d like to code and test the apps. Not necessary to test apps on my Chromebook, but would be nice

#4

If you found a way, I’d love to know. ChromeOS is slowly releasing Linux features, but I doubt a full command line is on the way. I will probably either replace ChromeOS with GalliumOS (Xubuntu) or dual boot ChromeOS and Ubuntu

#5

It turns out I’m wrong about a lot of stuff.

  1. After reading through the installation guide, I decided GalliumOS was too much trouble for me. However, I did use Crouton to install Xenial Ubuntu 16.04 on an Acer Chromebook 15 (cb5-571, made in 2015). This has been largely successful. It was easy to do, it runs well, and I have successfully installed NodeJS, NPM, and Ionic in it. As a test, I just created a blank template app and used ionic serve. All of this has worked and worked well. I also installed VSCode and it works well. HOWEVER: The Ionic DevApp was able to recognize the presence of the app on WiFi, but not able to load it. I ran into the same problem when running Ubuntu/Bash on Windows Subsystem for Linux. I’m guessing the install in both cases is missing something that would be present in a full installation of Linux, because the DevApp works when I use a PC with full Ubuntu installed.

  2. Command line is coming to some Chromebooks. Linux Apps are coming to some Chromebooks and will run them in Debian 9. I read a guide showing someone using apt-get in either Crosh or Shell (couldn’t see). This gave them access to the Debian repository and whole lot else. I just checked and Ionic can be installed by Debian 9. I haven’t tested any of this, but it’s making me rethink my recent purchase and look for a chromebook that will eventually receive access to Linux Apps.

#6

I have a few of those older Chromebooks lieing around. Did you use a specific tutorial or instructions?

Maybe some ports closed? I think the DevApp has a custom protocol that sends/receives on some ports. Might be worth to open an issue if you can find the appropriate repository.

Unfortunately only to the newer ones :frowning:

#7

I’m sorry to revive an old thread and reply so late but I wanted to leave an answer in case others find this in their search results.

I followed this Crouton guide. It requires entering Developer Mode before hand.

Your idea about the ports is probably right. The thing I suggested makes no sense, ha. I haven’t bothered to look into it, because if I want to test on my phone, I can just do it from another computer.

You’re right, about the older Chromebooks. I have an Acer Chromebook 15 (CB5-571) which is on the list of Chromebooks that will never get Crostini/Linux app support, so my only options are either Crouton or GalliumOS. I like the flexibility that running Crouton gives me. I also like that this old Chromebook only cost me $80 at a pawn shop.

I did eventually buy a new chromebook, but I returned it after a while. I was able to use the shell as in normal Linux distros and I successfully installed Ionic. However, when you close the laptop or let your computer fall asleep, ChromeOS closes the terminal. I typically run VS Code by typing “Code .” in terminal, which means VS Code was closed and my unsaved changes were lost every time I closed the laptop. I was also unable to use the Ionic DevApp with the new Chromebook. So for these reasons, I actually prefer using Crouton on the older Chromebook.

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